I’m feeling quite pleased with myself for being the person to write for our blog’s 100th post – sorry Sarah! – but whilst she is away, I thought I’d reflect on some aspects of the building work.

You may have noticed the quote in post 98 “It really is the most beautiful brickwork at the top of the lift shaft and no-one will ever see it”, well here it is:

Beautiful brickwork at the top of the lift shaft

Beautiful brickwork at the top of the lift shaft

Our Building and Facilities Manager, Simona Tocco, has had regular access to the building site and she is the one to thank for taking photos of the works on site. During the build both she and Project Manager Simon have come across original details of the building such as this:

A face on view of our Purlin Cleat

A face on view of our Purlin Cleat

An overhead shot of the Purlin Cleat. On the left you can see the cleft which secures the roof support

An overhead shot of the Purlin Cleat. On the left you can see the cleft which secures the roof support

Purlin Cleats are now manufactured in metal, so it’s great to see how it was done nearly 300 years ago. Whilst on the subject of metal, here is a selection of original nails we have collected. It’s amazing to see how nails have developed over the years, from these which were handmade to the now mass manufactured versions we use today.

A collection of Georgian nails. L-R: a beam nail, purlin cleat nail and 6 smaller floor nails

A collection of Georgian nails. L-R: a beam nail, purlin cleat nail and 6 smaller floor nails

Enthusiasm: Through the roof
Progress: It’s all go here
Quote: “Don’t you know what a Purlin Cleat is?!”